A Look To Windward

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blue-voids:

1970’s interiors, Verner Panton

(via push-pause)

showslow:

Flightwave by Circa1983 | http://circa1983.ca/FlightwDve

Aisle seat? No thanks, I’ll take the window. This is how I roll when it comes to flying. Why pass up the opportunity to look down on earth from 35,000 feet? It’s an aerial photography mecca if you’re prepared.

A few tips if you’re planning to shoot from a plane:

1. I’ve found that lenses above 50mm tend to give the best results. This is because they focus past the airline window’s glass better than wider lenses and can isolate your shots better. I’ve even used my 70-200mm with great results for this reason.

2. Shoot at large apertures and fast shutter speeds. This is to keep the shots crisp despite the vibration and movement of the airplane. 

3. If you have the choice, book your flights so that you’re taking off or landing during a sunrise or sunset for optimal lighting and colour. Also, picking a seat near the front of the plane increases the likelihood that your view down to Earth isn’t obscured by the plane’s wing.

entheogenicmushroomomens:

travel-as-a-happy-hippie:

barefootawareness:

Cutieeee

Daww cute

I love this picture of myself to no end. 

generic-art:

Rafał Olbiński

sonnytactiks:

Blaze it or praise it.

letstransformtheworld:

 

letstransformtheworld

starting the day off right with my lil friend ;p

pixography:

Emma Watkinson
sonicthebootyhog:

squint
hampshirewildlife:

Face Off on Flickr.
poptech:

Mesmerizing photos of Iceland from Emmanuel Coupe-Kalomiris that look like they could be viewed through either a microscope or airplane window. Via WIRED. Photo: Emmanuel Coupe-Kalomiris

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Marcela Cárdena

Arbol de la Vida

2009

(via generic-art)

laughingsquid:

Amazing ‘Game of Thrones’ Pop-Up Book That Folds Out to Create a Giant 3D Map of Westeros